River Cherwell

River Cherwell

LaunchesPublic RoutesKnown HazardsParking
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Welcome to PaddlePoints Waterways

PaddlePoints Waterways focuses on individual bodies of water across the UK. On this page you'll find a map, launches, routes, licensing information, paddle trail downloads, services, and more about one particular river or canal. For the full PaddlePoints with search bar follow this link.

PaddlePoints can be accessed without creating a free account, but registering will allow you to map your own public and private routes on this waterway. You will also be able to comment on others' points, upload images, and create Personal Information Markers to receive updates about new routes and points.

You can use the buttons above to access map information on other waterways. Simply toggle the waterway to display it. If you do, note that the content surrounding the map area will remain the same. Use the green file icon next to the toggle if you want to open another dedicated river or canal page with relevant licensing information.

Use the icon above to access the legend. All map points, rivers, and canals information will appear in this section here. Click or tap a point on the map to display the information. Actual routes will appear on the map.

River Licensing Information

Licence Required?

No licence required

Rising in Northamptonshire and flowing through the pretty Oxfordshire countryside, the River Cherwell is a gem in the crown of rural England.

This pretty, slow flowing, tree lined river stretches for 40 miles all the way to Oxford where it joins the river Thames.

It is suitable for paddlers looking for a rural adventure, with lush green river banks and plenty of places to stop and admire the beauty of the countryside along the way.

Things to see on the River Cherwell

As you paddle towards Banbury, a historic market town not far from the Cotswolds, you will be greeted with a variety of interesting shops and cafes… the perfect places to stop along route!

Although nothing remains of the castle today, you will paddle past the site of the castle, built in 1135 which became a royalist stronghold during the English Civil War. Look out for the mill building and miller’s cottage near to where the castle once stood.

Due to the slow, steady nature of the river it’s only really suitable for paddlers looking for a quiet paddle, white water enthusiasts will want to look elsewhere. But if you are looking for a little adventure, as the river is quite shallow and narrow in parts, it means when you do paddle it you’re likely to have it all to yourselves.