Kennet and Avon Canal

Kennet and Avon Canal

LaunchesPublic RoutesKnown HazardsParking
21
1
0
26
X

Register

Welcome to PaddlePoints Waterways

PaddlePoints Waterways focuses on individual bodies of water across the UK. On this page you'll find a map, launches, routes, licensing information, paddle trail downloads, services, and more about one particular river or canal. For the full PaddlePoints with search bar follow this link.

PaddlePoints can be accessed without creating a free account, but registering will allow you to map your own public and private routes on this waterway. You will also be able to comment on others' points, upload images, and create Personal Information Markers to receive updates about new routes and points.

You can use the buttons above to access map information on other waterways. Simply toggle the waterway to display it. If you do, note that the content surrounding the map area will remain the same. Use the green file icon next to the toggle if you want to open another dedicated river or canal page with relevant licensing information.

Use the icon above to access the legend. All map points, rivers, and canals information will appear in this section here. Click or tap a point on the map to display the information. Actual routes will appear on the map.

Canal Licensing Information

License Authority

Canal and River Trust

The Kennet and Avon canal passes through lovely countryside and small villages, and at 87 miles long with 105 locks along the route, it’s the perfect canal for those who like a multi-day adventure, or just a really challenging paddle!

The Kennet and Avon canal crosses from Reading to Bristol. The canal gives views of many narrow boats, locks, aqueducts, and landscapes, with a level towpath to either walk or cycle on. Many paddlers know the stretch from Devizes (west of this route), to London, through taking part in the annual Devizes to Westminster Canoe Race, run every year since the 1960s.

The charming historic market town of Devizes lies at the very heart of Wiltshire. Founded in Norman times at the boundaries (the Latin ‘ad Divisas’) of surrounding villages, the town grew up around the castle. The outline of the town walls shows in the ‘D’ shape of the centre which retains its medieval street plan. The town is compact and, being on the level, easy to walk round so do take the opportunity to visit the town too.

The canal does have some swing bridges and we would advise that you ensure you have considered the craft you are in, the river levels and the potential need to portage. If you do go under these bridges please look out for any nuts and bolts protruding below the bridge.